VirtualProx experiments 2021

I’ve written a ton of posts about running a Proxmox cluster in VirtualBox.

Part of why I write these things is to help me record work that I did in the past, kind of like a journal. Part of it is the hope that someone will read it and benefit from it. Mostly, building home lab shit and writing about it is how I cope with… *gestures vaguely*

The new Proxmox 7.X version is out, and the Proxmox Backup server has also been released. So I set up another Proxmox cluster in Virtual Box. Here are some observations and things that I learned from the exercise.

  1. I learned enough about host only networks in Virtualbox to eliminate the need for a management workstation.
    I am a big fan of setting up a workstation with a GUI to test network configurations during the network construction phase. In the old days of hardware that meant using an old garbage PC, even though it was a waste of electricity. Now that we have virtualization, I still put a low powered VM on different subnets for troubleshooting. In those same old days when I was growing my Unix skills, I almost always used a Windows PC with multiple network cards because Windows has historically been completely stupid about VLANs and the like.

    Also, using a workstation with an OS that you are very comfortable with lets you focus on what you are learning. Trying to figure out a new OS while also figuring out networking, or virtualization, or scripting/programming is overwhelming. So, in previous labs, I recommended spinning up a basic VM that sat on the host only network for doing firewall/network administration tasks. Well, no more!

    It turns out that the IP address that you assign in the VirtualBox host network manager app is just the static IP address that your physical host has on that network interface. It’s not any sort of network configuration. I know that should have been obvious, but like the management workstation mentioned above, I am figuring this out as I go.

    So, when you are setting up your host only network interfaces, just pick any IP in the range that you want to use. I love the number 23, so that is the last octet that I pick for my physical host. If you set that IP to something other than .1 or .254 or any IP in your DHCP range, you can use the browser on your host computer to configure the ProxMox cluster. You will still need static IPs and multiple network interfaces for management, clustering, and the like.

  2. Doing hardcore system administration tasks via the web UI has gotten a lot better
    My Unix/Linux skills are decent. Not as great as professional sysadmins, but better than most professional IT types. The same goes for my knowledge of networking and virtualization. I can hold a conversation with the folks that specialize in it. So, when I am trying to figure out ProxMox shit, I prefer the web UI so I am not getting out into the weeds chasing down Linux sytax issues or finding obscure things in config files, which I like to call Config File Fuckery(tm).

    You can configure the IPs for your interfaces with the UI, which didn’t work well in the past. You can also define your VLANs in the web UI, and change their names. I like for the VLAN ID/tag to correspond to the third octet of the assigned IP, so VLAN200 would have an IP of 192.168.200.0/24. Yes you can do vlan0 -> 192.168.0.0/24, but that’s no fun šŸ™‚

    I have not yet figured out how to create a ZFS pool on a host using the web UI. You can create the pool as storage in the web UI, configuring your disks for use in the pool still requires the command line, as far as I can tell.

    Creating the cluster in the web UI is super simple now, but specifying a network for VM migration to another cluster node still requires editing the datacenter.cfg file as outlined in Part 3: Building the Cluster.

  3. Proxmox backup server is just for backups

    Having a dedicated server for hosting backups is a great idea. Normally, I set up an NFS server as shared storage between the nodes, where I put container templates, ISO files, and snapshots of machines.

    Proxmox Backup Server integrates into your Proxmox datacenter as storage, and you can use it as a destination for backups. That part is pretty slick, but you can ONLY set it up as a target for backups.

    The other shared storage stuff, doesn’t look like it’s an option. At least not in the web UI.

    I am sure there is a reason for having one server for backups and another for shared storage, which probably has to do with tape drives. For my use case, I would like to download ISOs and container templates to one place and have it be available to all the cluster nodes, which requires an NFS server somewhere. I also want to use shared storage for backups, which could be a Proxmox Backup server OR the same NFS server that I would need for shared storage.

  4. Running a backup server and a NAS seems like a waste
    I have seen forum posts about mounting an NFS share and using it as the datastore. I was more interested in doing the opposite, which is exporting an NFS share to the cluster nodes. It’s Debian Linux under the hood, and I can absolutely just create a directory on the root filesystem and export it. That’s not the point.

    I have also seen forum posts where users run the backup server as a VM. This is probably the use case for the NFS data store: keeping the files on a NAS and the backup software on a VM. I am contemplating doing the opposite, which is running the backup server on bare metal, and running the file server as a VM. I already have a hardware NAS that I am currently using as the shared storage for my hardware Proxmox cluster.

    In hardware news, I have acquired 3 rackmount servers for my hardware cluster. I don’t have a rack or anything to put them in, so stay tuned for some DIY rack making!

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